Cloud Computing

  • Last week I attended the Paris Open Source Summit, were I saw things as interesting and diverse as autonomous tractors, Open Source legal support and “degooglized Internet” visions. Please read that other post to know more. Here, I am only going to describe one other moment of POSS 2016, about two other arguments I care a lot about, and on which I wouldn’t mind working again, even if these days I am mostly busy with Digital DIY.
  • I just got an email by somebody asking how the Free Software alternative to corporate social networks that I call percloud would work. I answered that…In a certain sense, we may compare a percloud to a traditional FTP server on which you would upload your posts, pictures and so on, in order to make them available from any computer or smartphone with an FTP client or Web browser, to you and every other Internet user else with the right permissions.
  • Believe it or not, I only discovered arKos last Friday, through this Slashdot announcement: a project (apparently) very similar to the percloud, which is my own proposal for a Free Software alternative to Facebook, Gmail &C. Following the links from Slashdot I discovered this interview to the arkOS developer and even more projects in the same space that I didn’t know: buddycloud, Personal Clouds and unhosted. update 2013/10/08, 10:20am GMT+1: I discovered just now the IndieWebCamp projects.
  • Cloud computing is all the rage today: everyone wants us to migrate our digital activities to the “cloud”, that is a new world of remotely hosted data and services. This is no science-fiction: if you have a Gmail or Facebook account you are already using cloud computing today. There are, of course, many advantages to the cloud concept, but also some inherent and serious risks. This report from 2021 explains them: