Star Trek creator was clueless about computers

roddenberry-star-trek-in-floppies“Star Trek creator didn’t have a clue of how computer actually work, and how to preserve digital documents, and the curators of his estate weren’t much better”: this should be the appropriate title for the story titled “How Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry’s words were freed from old floppy disks”. (but see the important update below!)
Continue reading Star Trek creator was clueless about computers

The day the mobile phone took a wrong, dumb turn

talkase: a real smartphone, attached to a dumb oneA long time ago, we had really smart mobile phones: devices compatible with any pocket, that wouldn’t distract us every second, but get enough signal even inside a cave, last one week without recharging, and years without breaking. Then we got dumb phones that do all the opposite. Continue reading The day the mobile phone took a wrong, dumb turn

Forget fablabs and makerspaces! Who ELSE is promoting Digital DIY in Europe?

Digital DIY projectAs some of you may already know, these days I also work in the H2020 research project “Digital DIY”, a world of which 3D printing is only the most fashionable part, but not the biggest, nor the most important. Among other things, right now we’d need to know something that is pretty hard to discover without local (meaning: yours!) assistance, because it is “hidden” behind many different languages and layers of burocratic structures and inertia: Continue reading Forget fablabs and makerspaces! Who ELSE is promoting Digital DIY in Europe?

Citizen cloud thoughts, after fOSSa 2015

I had (at least) three big reasons to be at the fOSSa 2015 conference, a couple of weeks ago. Two already covered elsewhere and one, “Citizen Cloud: Towards a more decentralized internet?”, that deserves its own separate post. Continue reading Citizen cloud thoughts, after fOSSa 2015

Pesaro, Microsoft and OpenOffice: the consequences

A few days ago I summarized the most questionable or uncertain points of the software odissey of the City of Pesaro, saying that I’d also post questions and consequences, both for the City and Open Source advocates, not mentioned yet in this story. For Pesaro, the road forward has little or nothing to do with the initial topic, that is Open Source Software in Public Administration. The advocates, instead, should rethink some of their strategies. Let’s start from Pesaro, but what follows applies to practically every city. Continue reading Pesaro, Microsoft and OpenOffice: the consequences