E Voting

  • Last week I was asked this question: “If relatively secure financial transactions can exist, relatively secure voting can exist on the internet, can it not?” My answer? No. Because…(please note that here I only have in mind online voting for actual political/administrative elections. In all other cases, e.g. to vote who should win some reality show, I care much less about the whole issue) Financial transactions are “relatively secure” only because if they go wrong someone surely notices it, often immediately, and comes asking for a refund or repetition.
  • Mashable has a piece asking How Close Are We to Internet Voting?. It’s an interesting piece, even if part of it falls straight into the “self-fulfilling prophecy” category, building on statements like: It would be naive to think that Internet voting isn’t coming “the writing on the wall seems clear: Widespread online elections will be a reality in the near future” Apart from general technical issues, here I just want to thank Mashable reader “Neil Fox” for adding in a comment to that page what may be the Best Short Argument Ever against online voting:
  • (this page is part of the Family Guide to Digital Freedom, 2007 edition and an example of the issues presented in my Digital Citizens Basics course. Please do read its introduction to know more about the Guide, especially if you mean to comment this page. Thanks) E-voting is coming, or has already arrived, in my Country. How can I understand if it’s implemented properly, without risks of abuse? What is the right way to e-vote?
  • (this page is part of the Family Guide to Digital Freedom, 2007 edition. Please do read that introduction to know more about the Guide, especially if you mean to comment this page. Thanks) (the first parter of this chapter is here) Why banalize voting? Even ignoring the practical problems, the whole concept of e-voting is quite depressing, really. In our culture, we still place much more importance in signatures on papers than in shiny computer monitors.