Civil Rights

  • (this is a reformatted/expandedq version of a comment I made in November 2013 on the Libre Office mailing list) Other list members where saying they saw nothing like “holding people hostage” in free trials of software: > >>I didn't know we considered trialware "cunning". > > >They let people create & edit documents for a while and then hold > >them hostage, until the users coughs up for MS Office.
  • A reader of my critique to the “Linux owns the Internet” slogan just made the comment integrally copied here:I agree that some of the big companies are pure evil when it comes to user’s data, but your suggestion that this is Linux’s “tragicomical proof of failure” is just plain wrong, even more than the catchy title you linked to. Linux and the GNU software collection provide a flexible and solid server system.
  • The organizers of the first Linux presentation in an Italian shopping center asked me to prepare a short list of questions to hand out to all the visitors of that shopping center. They specifically asked for short, very simple questions that would fit in one page and help everybody, especially people with no interest at all in software as such, to get a quick idea of some basic issues, and possibly engage in a discussion.
  • The commitment with which certain companies try to make the problems caused by their products and practices a general issue for which they have no fault, that is something that should be fixed by others with public money, is impressive. I just had a good laugh reading a BBC report about the latest, exceptional idea on how to fix the huge problems caused worldwide by virus-infected computers (that in the great majority of cases run some version of Microsoft Windows):
  • (this page is a part of the essay I wrote for the Open Government Book. For copyright info, see the introduction) Index Why Open Digital Standards Matter in Government: Introduction The Digital Age Explained Standards and the Problems with Digital Technology Why Has Digital Gone Bad So Often? The Huge Positive Potential of Digital Technologies Free and Open Standards and Software: The Digital Basis of Open Government
  • (this page is a part of the essay I wrote for the Open Government Book. For copyright info, see the introduction) Index Why Open Digital Standards Matter in Government: Introduction The Digital Age Explained Standards and the Problems with Digital Technology Why Has Digital Gone Bad So Often? The Huge Positive Potential of Digital Technologies Free and Open Standards and Software: The Digital Basis of Open Government
  • On April 27th, 2010, I assisted to a lecture from David Sasaki of Global Voices Online (GVO) about “Citizen Media and the Technology for Transparency Network (TNN)”. This is a transcript of the notes I took that night, plus a couple of general comments about Citizen Media, Transparency in Government and related topics. Where do you shop each day?
  • (this is the second part of an interview to Tony Baechler about the usability of Free Software by vision-impaired users). Stop: Tony, what kind of resources would you like to have available, in order to convince more blind users to try Linux and Free Software, at least through a live CD? Tony: Hopefully, I would be able to point them to various distros being demonstrated and audio tutorials, custom written for vision-impaired users, explaining how to perform various tasks.
  • Back in 2006, I wrote that the Free Software community and disabled users must learn to communicate and invited Free Software developers to do their part. Last week I interviewed Tony Baechler, an active member of the Blinux mailing list, to check how things are going in 2010, and to know more about a very interesting project for Linux vision-impaired users he’s trying to launch.
  • We regularly hear from prime time news or urban legends how Internet is some sort of Big Brother (the real one… able to track and report to some more or less hidden controllers everything we do online, to the point that what was once called privacy is dead.