Best Practices

  • The ubiquitousness of no-brain-required social networks and mobile apps has made many people forget, or never learn, a boring truth of digital life: a LOT non-ephemeral online communication still happens via less glamorous, but much more effective tools like email and mailing list. This can have unintended consequences. It is in your interest to understand this, because it is still almost impossible that you can live an adult life without using email at all, and it will be so for a few more years, at least.
  • I just got a request to run a workshop on “Open Data in and from Schools” next week, at the Open Data Week in Marseille. (added 2013/06/21, 07:30) IMPORTANT: please note that this is NOT, I repeat, NOT about creating and using open data ABOUT schools, in order to run them better, monitor their “performances” or anything like that. This is about things to do in class or as homework, with very very basic computer skills, even when there is only computer per school with only very slow/intermittent connectivity!
  • I’m just back from the 2013 Economics and Commons Conference in Berlin. A great event, in which I took lots of general notes synthesized in another post that I’ll publish tomorrow. This one, instead, contains just questions and suggestions from me that I already shared at the conference, or I’d like to share with everybody interested in Commons. A separate post contains my critique to certain arguments against copyright I heard at the same conference.
  • UPDATE 2014/03/11: the information below is NOT up to date anymore. The current version of AntexWeb does not have those problems. You can read its current specifications in the answer I just received today from Antex (this is a shortest version of an Italian article I published here) Antex is a company that (emphasis mine) “has been providing ideas and personnel management and administration services to promote the development and evolution of companies, and of the people that form them, for 50 years, making the most of integrated experiences and skills that are updated daily”
  • Software Architecture is a 162 pages course book on, you guessed it, software architecture. The book, which is a contribution to the Open University Netherlands (OUNL) to the Free Technology Academy is released under a Creative Commons Attribute ShareAlike License and downloadable for free and without any registration, from the URL above. The LinuxQuestions.org website Tradepub, a partner of LinuxQuestions.org (which is just one of the many partners of Tradepub, and is mentioned here because it is the website from which I and others arrived to the Tradepub pages shown here: please note their URL, the logo in the top left corner of the first one and above all the explanations from LinuxQuestions in the comments!
  • (this is part of a paper originally proposed for a conference) Abstract: making custom integrated circuits at home or school that are more powerful and much more flexible than the popular Open Source Arduino platform is still a relatively unknown concept. This activity, however, is not just much more affordable and easy today than just a few years ago thanks to FPGAs: it may also have important social and educational consequences.
  • The adjective resilient means (among other things) “tending to recover from or adjust easily to misfortune or change”. That’s an excellent capability to have in though times like these, isn’t it? You may think that resiliency means roughing it like Rambo or the Amish, or that it is a lifestyle that only very rich people who can buy their own ranch can afford. That’s not true. Resilience, especially in the current economical situation, may be both a smarter way to live and a necessity for everybody, especially people with very, very normal lifes and jobs (or lack thereof…).
  • More than ten years ago I discovered John Naisbitt’s famous quote: “We are drowning in information but starved for knowledge.” This month I’ve discovered a wonderful piece by Neal Gabler that goes further: The Elusive Big Idea. This is a really short excerpt of the best points, but please read the whole piece and think seriously about it! (for the record, the fourth point below is one of the many reasons why I still prefer writing and reading to podcasts and videoclips)
  • Massimo Melica is a lawyer in Milan specialized in ICT law. Today Massimo posted on Facebook, as he does periodically, a great piece he wrote against online violence on women (Italian only, sorry). The reactions on Facebook, still coming while I write, seem so far to discuss almost exclusively (I only refer to the number of related comments) if, how much, when and how the concept that “whoever got in troubles for placing online his or her private pictures deserves it”.
  • USA federal courts plan to destroy all records on judicial cases that did not go to trial that were filed between 1970 and 1995 and reduce the current retention time for other records from 25 to 15 years. The reason is saving money. Preserving those files cost over $6.2 million last year. The new plan “will help save $7.7 million over the next 10 years”. Of course, this is causing great concern among legal historians and advocates for public access to important information.