Education

  • The logo of the ScoutLinux distribution Almost twelve years ago, I pointed out some links between Scouting and Free as in Freedom Software, like, for example, those between B-P’s call to“in some cases to have the fun of taking a hand in developing [wonders], and also in being able to help other people..” and the GPL clause stating that “For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you must give the recipients all the rights that you have”.
  • Some months ago, TechCrunch reported that, on High-Tech cruise ships like the Quantum Of The Sea, “Wi-Fi is fast and it’s everywhere” for one specific reason that I really don’t like .“The real goal here is to offer… constant connectivity for always-on passengers – namely the kids of older passengers. While Mom and Mom enjoy a fine tipple on the fo’c’s’le, kids can keep texting. It’s a sad compromise but one necessary to keep nervous gadget lovers happy on vacation.
  • fOSSa 2015 was such a great conference that I and Wouter Tebbens already wrote four other posts about it (see below). Here are the last bits that are worth sharing but did not fit elsewhere.Open Education What Mitja Jermol and his colleagues are doing in Slovenia is REALLY interesting, go check it out. Seriously. I can only add that they seem in a great position to, in addition to what they are already doing, _also _bring Open Data in/from schools, as I suggested here a while ago.
  • I had (at least) three big reasons to be at the fOSSa 2015 conference, a couple of weeks ago. Two already covered elsewhere and one, “Citizen Cloud: Towards a more decentralized internet?”, that deserves its own separate post. Before getting to that, however, let me quickly remind the first two reasons: first, I and Wouter Tebbens had to present a great research project we of the Free Knowledge Institute are working on, that is Digital Do-It-Yourself (DiDIY).
  • If and when the author (including me, I routinely do that on OTHER websites I run, or contribute to!) of some web page, video etc.. tells you that you can copy it all elsewhere, by all means DO it. In all other cases, including “sharing” them on Facebook or similar networks, or sending the full thing via email, you do a serious disservice… not just to that author but, **above all, **to all the people with which you “share” that stuff.
  • An interesting article at The Conversation concludes that: perhaps it’s time for the pen to say it’s farewells for regular use in the classroom, replaced by the smartphone and relegated to ‘writing time’, just like we used to have “computer time” back when I was a kid. I agree that, in classes where all the students and teachers have both a smartphone and affordable bandwidth always available, smartphones may do much more to improve learning than it usually happens in such classes.
  • _(this is a partial translation of an article I published on the italian Pionero Web magazine in April 2014. The second part is here). _Several of my publications and projects come, among other things, from these considerations (which of course I am not the only one to have made!): my official slogan since 2006⁄2007: Your civil rights and the quality of your life heavily depend on how software is used AROUND you
  • (this is a proposal for a talk and related workshop that I submitted for a conference that took place in autumn 2013. The proposal was accepted but eventually didn’t happen due to lack of funding for travel expenses. Since the idea is not tied to that specific event in any way, here it is) Young people have always been critical of politics and public institutions in general. This, of course, is absolutely natural and even necessary, to a degree.
  • is that ridiculous disclaimer plastered over too many clueless websites: All images on are readily available in various places on the Internet and believed to be in public domain This is crap, guys. Now, if you believe that everything online should be in the public domain, that’s an entirely different matter. We may even discuss it some other time. But stuff readily available online is NOT by default in the public domain.
  • Casual browsing (more on this below) just brought me to the website of the Girl Scouts of Southern Nevada (GSSN). As many other organizations of all kinds, in the USA and elsewhere, they are, as clearly stated in their official Application for Employment: an equal opportunity employer. All applications for employment will be considered without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin, citizenship, disability or marital status.