Star Trek creator was clueless about computers

roddenberry-star-trek-in-floppies“Star Trek creator didn’t have a clue of how computer actually work, and how to preserve digital documents, and the curators of his estate weren’t much better”: this should be the appropriate title for the story titled “How Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry’s words were freed from old floppy disks”. (but see the important update below!)
Continue reading Star Trek creator was clueless about computers

The day the mobile phone took a wrong, dumb turn

talkase: a real smartphone, attached to a dumb oneA long time ago, we had really smart mobile phones: devices compatible with any pocket, that wouldn’t distract us every second, but get enough signal even inside a cave, last one week without recharging, and years without breaking. Then we got dumb phones that do all the opposite. Continue reading The day the mobile phone took a wrong, dumb turn

Citizen cloud thoughts, after fOSSa 2015

I had (at least) three big reasons to be at the fOSSa 2015 conference, a couple of weeks ago. Two already covered elsewhere and one, “Citizen Cloud: Towards a more decentralized internet?”, that deserves its own separate post. Continue reading Citizen cloud thoughts, after fOSSa 2015

Pesaro, Microsoft and OpenOffice: the consequences

A few days ago I summarized the most questionable or uncertain points of the software odissey of the City of Pesaro, saying that I’d also post questions and consequences, both for the City and Open Source advocates, not mentioned yet in this story. For Pesaro, the road forward has little or nothing to do with the initial topic, that is Open Source Software in Public Administration. The advocates, instead, should rethink some of their strategies. Let’s start from Pesaro, but what follows applies to practically every city. Continue reading Pesaro, Microsoft and OpenOffice: the consequences

The Free Software (icon) that we need the most. Fifteen years ago

Today, while cleaning up old backups, I found a text file named as this post, which I saved on November 17th, 2000, but never used. Cannot remember what I was planning to do with it, but here it goes. A bit naive, surely dated (just look at which companies I was suggesting to go for help…) but still interesting, considering how things stand today. Here it goes, unchanged: Continue reading The Free Software (icon) that we need the most. Fifteen years ago

Hacker proves with Open Data that Microsoft license costs don’t matter

(no, not really but…) In December 2014, italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi annunced soldipubblici.gov.it, a Web portal that provides official Open Data on public spending (“Soldi Pubblici”, that is) in Italy. Within a few hours, an italian Hacker, Continue reading Hacker proves with Open Data that Microsoft license costs don’t matter

Why you are very often wrong when you copy a full web page somewhere else online

If and when the author (including me, I routinely do that on OTHER websites I run, or contribute to!) of some web page, video etc.. tells you that you can copy it all elsewhere, by all means DO it. In all other cases, including “sharing” them on Facebook or similar networks, or sending the full thing via email, you do a serious disservice… not just to that author but, above all, to all the people with which you “share” that stuff. Continue reading Why you are very often wrong when you copy a full web page somewhere else online

Smart dust: coming soon to a lung near you?

You really can’t make this stuff up: I have just found, one after another in my RSS feed, two unrelated articles on Smart Dust that you must really read side by side: one about a wonderful future, another unintentionally exposing some of its, apparently, not-yet-considered consequences. Continue reading Smart dust: coming soon to a lung near you?