POSS 2016, from Open Hardware to “Open divorce” (*) and formats

I enjoyed OSSPARIS 16

Last week, I presented the current status of the EU-funded research I am working on these days, that is DiDIY (Digital DIY), at the Paris Open Source Summit. I have already reported about that side of the conference on the DiDIY blog, but I found many more interesting things at POSS 2016. Continue reading POSS 2016, from Open Hardware to “Open divorce” (*) and formats

Pesaro, Microsoft and OpenOffice: the consequences

A few days ago I summarized the most questionable or uncertain points of the software odissey of the City of Pesaro, saying that I’d also post questions and consequences, both for the City and Open Source advocates, not mentioned yet in this story. For Pesaro, the road forward has little or nothing to do with the initial topic, that is Open Source Software in Public Administration. The advocates, instead, should rethink some of their strategies. Let’s start from Pesaro, but what follows applies to practically every city. Continue reading Pesaro, Microsoft and OpenOffice: the consequences

The Free Software (icon) that we need the most. Fifteen years ago

Today, while cleaning up old backups, I found a text file named as this post, which I saved on November 17th, 2000, but never used. Cannot remember what I was planning to do with it, but here it goes. A bit naive, surely dated (just look at which companies I was suggesting to go for help…) but still interesting, considering how things stand today. Here it goes, unchanged: Continue reading The Free Software (icon) that we need the most. Fifteen years ago

Hacker proves with Open Data that Microsoft license costs don’t matter

(no, not really but…) In December 2014, italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi annunced soldipubblici.gov.it, a Web portal that provides official Open Data on public spending (“Soldi Pubblici”, that is) in Italy. Within a few hours, an italian Hacker, Continue reading Hacker proves with Open Data that Microsoft license costs don’t matter

On people offended when asked not to use Facebook, and who will die first

In December 2013 I came across something I still consider yet another proof of two things: first, much trust in the actual competence of many “digital savvy” Internet users is misplaced; second, many of the proposed alternatives to current social networks are trying to solve the wrong problem. Continue reading On people offended when asked not to use Facebook, and who will die first

Shall we waste twelve more years promoting Free office suites instead of open office formats?

Twelve (TWELVE!!!) years ago I asked OpenOffice users “Are you advocating OO correctly”. Six years ago I said the same things in a different format. A couple of weeks ago, I came across a perfect proof that that kind of advocay IS right, but so far has been never practiced enough. Continue reading Shall we waste twelve more years promoting Free office suites instead of open office formats?